Gary Cherr

Gary Cherr

University of California, Davis – Departments of Environmental Toxicology and Nutrition
Director, Bodega Marine Laboratory
Professor, Bodega Marine Laboratory

Bodega Marine Laboratory
P.O. Box 247
Bodega Bay , CA 94923

Phone: (707) 875-2051
Email: gncherr@ucdavis.edu
Fax: (707) 875-2009
  • About
  • Research
  • Teaching
  • Publications
  • Lab

 

  • B.A. Biology, Sonoma State University, 1979
  • Ph.D. Zoology, University of California, Davis 1984
  • National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, 1984-1986.

Examples of Current Laboratory Projects:

  1. Effects of oil on Pacific herring embryos in San Francisco Bay
  2. Effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and emerging contaminants on embryonic axis determination
  3. Multidrug resistance efflux transporters and their functions during development in invertebrates and vertebrates
  4. Effects of nanomaterials on embryo development and cell physiology in marine invertebrates
  5. Endocrine disruption in fish from the Sacramento/San Joaquin Delta
  6. Role of innate immune system glycoproteins (beta-defensins) in reproduction in mammals
  7. Sperm surface glycocalyx and its role in the evolution of internal reproduction
  8. Captive Breeding and Restoration of the Critically Endangered White Abalone, Haliotis sorenseni

Our laboratory focuses on the effects of natural and human-derived stressors on reproduction and development of marine organisms. We utilize developing systems as sensitive yet simple models for understanding mechanisms of toxicity and environmental stress. In addition, we investigate the physiological mechanisms by which these systems tolerate environmental stress.

The laboratory essentially has two main foci:

The first is more basic in nature and deals with molecules and physiological mechanisms involved in fertilization and early development.

The second is focused on the impacts of pollutants and altered habitats on early life stages that may ultimately lead to changes in populations.

For additional information see Research tab, above.