News

Latest News

Dr. Tawny Mata will join us as Executive Director of the Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute

July 05, 2019

Announcement

Dr. Tawny Mata will join us in August 2019 as the new Executive Director of the Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute at UC Davis.

We are extremely fortunate to have someone with her talents and experience to help lead us through the next steps of implementing our Strategic Plan, strengthening and expanding our internal and external programs and partnerships, and continuing to build on the foundation that our remarkable community has developed since CMSI launched, barely 6 years ago.

A Tidepool in Time

June 23, 2019

Witnessing a changed world from the rocky shores of Monterey Bay

Bay Nature Magazine, read more

Dying Oceans: Abalone Restoration In California

May 29, 2019

The ocean is a sponge for all the greenhouse gas emissions we produce, and entire aquatic ecosystems are beginning to collapse. Off the coast of California, the disappearing abalone population is raising flags about ocean health and the lasting impact of rising sea temperatures, acidification and pollution. Various teams of scientists, volunteers and businesspeople are collaborating to protect underwater species threatened by the invasion of sea urchins.

Endangered White Abalone Program Yields Biggest Spawning Success Yet

April 25, 2019

Millions of Eggs Bring Program 1 Step Closer to Saving Species

The Bodega Marine Laboratory’s white abalone program has millions of new additions following its most successful spawning ever at the University of California, Davis, facility. Three out of nine recently collected wild white abalone spawned last week, as did seven of 12 captive-bred white abalone. One wild female was particularly generous, producing 20.5 million eggs herself.

Lost Sea Creatures Wash Up on California Shores as Ocean Climate Shifts

April 17, 2019

"Five years ago, the Gulf of Alaska warmed to record temperatures, likely due to a sudden acceleration in the melting of Arctic sea ice. Usually a cold southern current flows along California. That year, the warm “blob” spread down the coast and, instead of blocking tropical species from moving north, it served as a balmy welcome to a variety of animals far from home."