Marine Ecology

Southern California margin benthic foraminiferal assemblages record recent centennial-scale changes in oxygen minimum zone

July 06, 2020

Microfossil assemblages provide valuable records to investigate variability in continental margin biogeochemical cycles, including dynamics of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). Analyses of modern assemblages across environmental gradients are necessary to understand relationships between assemblage characteristics and environmental factors... Read the full publication by Hannah Palmer, Tessa Hill, et al. in Biogeosciences

Spotlight on the Scientists: Carina Fish

June 17, 2020
Spotlight on the Scientists: Carina Fish

Written by Undergraduate Intern Jane Park

Exploring the Oceans

Corals are one of the most iconic images of the ocean, offering a spectacular scenery of vibrant, underwater castles for snorkelers and divers. But for marine biogeochemist ​Carina Fish​, these vacation spots aren’t just aesthetically pleasing. Corals are biological time capsules, making them a perfect toolset for Fish to utilize as she uncovers stories about the Earth’s past.

High variability of Blue Carbon storage in seagrass meadows at the estuary scale

April 09, 2020

By Aurora M. Ricart, Ph.D.

Seagrass meadows are considered important natural carbon sinks due to their capacity to store organic carbon (Corg) in sediments. However, the spatial heterogeneity of carbon storage in seagrass sediments needs to be better understood to improve the accuracy of Blue Carbon assessments, particularly when strong gradients are present. We performed an intensive coring study within a sub-tropical estuary to assess the spatial variability in sedimentary Corg associated with seagrasses, and to identify the key factors promoting this variability.

Lost Sea Creatures Wash Up on California Shores as Ocean Climate Shifts

April 17, 2019

"Five years ago, the Gulf of Alaska warmed to record temperatures, likely due to a sudden acceleration in the melting of Arctic sea ice. Usually a cold southern current flows along California. That year, the warm “blob” spread down the coast and, instead of blocking tropical species from moving north, it served as a balmy welcome to a variety of animals far from home."